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The Rugelach That Won Over France – Tuesdays with Dorie

 

This was Eva and my first time making rugelach so of course, I searched google images to get a better idea of what we were setting out to create.
The images were enticing and we both were excited to make a new sweet treat. Once our eyes curiosity had been met, of course we then wondered where, in history, did rugelach originate? Yes, I’m one of those people who own books like A History of Food and The Deluxe Food Lover’s Companion  and those books have been known to take up residence on my nightstand. Silly, I know, but I have found myself laughing out loud to some of past superstitions.  So, of course, I am going to research the roots and cultures who brought this treat to us and to top it off, it’s a great teaching moment for homeschool.

My highlight from the research is learning that rugelach can be spelled so many ways. Sweet news to me so I can stop, rechecking how to spell this word once and for all!  Karen Hochman shares that it’s known to be spelled any number of ways; rugelah, rugalah, rugelach, rugalach, rugulah, ruggelach, and ruggalach. She also gives the best historical view into the land of the European Jewish pastries that I could find. If your interest is peeked even a little you should check it out here .

At first read, I noticed Dorie wrote of peanuts being part of her rugelach, that won over the Air France attendants so I set out peanuts, only later to frantically re-read again and again the ingredient list looking for the peanuts we missed. There are none in this recipe, instead Dorie calls for pecans. Since pecans are not my or any of my family’s favorite nut I swapped them for almonds.

RKW_0605 RKW_0613 Dough at "curd" stage. BCM 12-9-14

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I measured all ingredients meticulously but in the end, I was left with over a cup of unused filling.  I think we may not have rolled the dough thin enough. This was apparent because we only had one revolution making a circle and not multiple spiraling layers as we had seen on google images. We did find, using the Wilson pie mat, like a sushi mat, made the dough easier to roll allowing us to keep pressure on the nut mixture and prevent the dough from cracking. Now all we need to do is make more! Which we’ve already started and there’s another batch chilling in the fridge for later.

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The finished product!

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The texture combination of gooey interior, flakey exterior and crunch made these taste pretty good and yes, even this non-coconut lover had seconds!

If you would like to make these royal treats just like Dorie does you can find the recipe over at Leite’s Culinaria. If you would like to read about how this recipe worked for Dorie’s group Baking Chez Moi here’s the link, maybe you’ll want to join us? Before I finished making my rugelach, I found myself reading the groups posts and found Mardi’s experience to be super helpful thanks Mardi!

Happy Baking!

Next up for Tuesdays with Dorie is a Gingerbread Bûche de Noël.

Rachelle and Eva

p.s. This is unrelated to the post other than I would really like to figure out how to get my smaller photos to line up horizontally rather than vertically. On my edit page they show up beautifully sequentially left to right  If anyone has any info on how to do this I would love to know!  Merci.

15 Comments Post a comment
  1. The coconut seemed a bit odd to me but in the end, I enjoyed it. Your rolls turned out nicely!

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    December 10, 2014
    • Thank you Alisa, I kept the coconut in, knowing my oldest daughter loves both coconut and chocolate and I would have no worries of them going stale. But I did enjoy them too.

      Like

      December 10, 2014
  2. Sorry I can’t help with your photo issue but glad my trials and errors were helpful in rugelach making! These are good, aren’t they?

    Like

    December 10, 2014
  3. Finished product looks great. I bet these would have been good with peanuts too.

    Like

    December 10, 2014
  4. Anne Eckmann #

    Yum!! Looks delicious. Fun to perfect a new treat. Killer idea for Home a School project too. Peace Anne

    Like

    December 10, 2014
  5. Your rugelach look delightfully flaky, Rachelle! I intended to do half a recipe, but made extra dough just in case. Turns out that half the recipe for the filling was perfect for the whole recipe of dough. Thank you for doing our homework for us. 😉

    Like

    December 11, 2014
    • Hi Adriana, thank you 🙂 yes, the dough turned out light and flaky. I think I had several cookies yesterday! I’m glad to hear that you found the filling to have been enough for two batches as well. I couldn’t figure out what I had done wrong.
      cheers!

      Like

      December 11, 2014
  6. Your rugelach look beautiful! I have been making rugelach for years from a tried and true recipe given to me by a friend! This one is just as wonderful even though it is just a bit fussy to put together!

    Like

    December 11, 2014
    • Hi Kathy, thank you I was a little worried when I started rolling the dough with the filling( and it was falling out) that it might turn out a sweet mess but in the end the rolls held and it all worked out- whew!

      Like

      December 11, 2014
  7. I enjoyed the background information…great homeschooling project! I am sure it was a hit! 🙂

    Like

    December 14, 2014
    • Hi is this a keeper, I’m glad you enjoyed the background info, I love history. Thank you, yes it was a hit, we learned quite a lot and the sweet rewards were the “carrot” at the end. Today my 11 y/o is playing “chopped” with a couple of friends. A main goal is to help facilitate a life long love of learning and I think it’s working! All the best to you.

      Like

      December 14, 2014
  8. and also..how do you get 600 followers!! 🙂

    Like

    December 14, 2014

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